Tag : learning

A Conversation with Sir Ken Robinson

Recently, I sat down with world-renowned creativity expert and New York Times Best Selling Author, Sir Ken Robinson. We discussed a range of issues including the impact of that talk, as well as the impact on education of standardised tests and the rise of the no excuses approach in schools. We also explored that whilst many subscribe to Sir Ken’s views, there are many who don’t.  We recorded our chat and it is featured in my semi-regular spot in this week’s TER Podcast. […]

Continue Reading

[SNEAK PREVIEW] Chatting with Sir Ken Robinson

Last week I presented at the Future Schools event in Melbourne. As well as speaking across the program, I also facilitated a panel discussion with former Templestowe College principal, Peter Hutton; the CEO of AITSL, Lisa Rodgers and creativity expert and New York Times best selling author, Sir Ken Robinson. After the event I sat down with Sir Ken for an interview that will feature in next week’s TER Podcast, but until then, here is a sneak preview of what […]

Continue Reading

Do Schools Kill Learning?

Ten years ago, a talk by Sir Ken Robinson was published on TED. Having being viewed over 41 million times on TED alone, it has become one of the most – if not the most – viewed TED talk ever. It was provocatively titled: Do Schools Kill Creativity?  The popularity of Ken’s talk catapulted him into the Public Speaking Stratosphere, not only in education, but also more broadly with many corporate and multinational organisations engaging him to present to their communities. Clearly his message […]

Continue Reading

Snake, Walkmans, Moments & School…

What do these three things have in common,  and why on earth would I waste your time asking you that question? If you’re of a certain vintage you’ll be aware of just how amazing Nokia phones were. What’s that? You can’t remember? Check this out. Of course, Sony Walkmans were so popular even competitor’s offerings were referred to as Walkmans, and how many times have you thanked your lucky stars that your Kodak Moments weren’t captured in the era of Facebook or Instagram? Nowadays, a straw poll of any […]

Continue Reading

Engaging the Student Voice

The basis for student voice is to be found in Article 12 of the United Nation Convention of the Rights of the Child, which sets out the right of children and young people to express an opinion and to have that opinion taken into account when decisions are being made on any matter that affects them. How many decisions at your school take into account the opinions of students? I mean really take students’ opinions into account. If we’re honest many of our […]

Continue Reading

3 Common Myths About Innovation in Education

1. We’re innovative. The kids all have iPads.  To do what? To do what you already did quicker, more efficiently or on a larger scale? In many schools the power of the iFad or whatever technology has been wheeled into the school is compromised by the way in which they’re allowed or – more importantly – not allowed to be used. Even if we adopt the higher order thinking of the SAMR Model, how innovative are we really being? Innovating in […]

Continue Reading

Do we get Engagement Wrong in School?

I’m really pleased to say that in 2014 I’ll be writing a regular column, School of Thought, for the Australian Teacher Magazine. My first column for 2014 is now up! I say engagement is overused because I witness, all too often, schools confusing conformity for engagement. Measures such as attendance, grades, homework, and adherence to uniform rules etc. are all taken to determine whether students are engaged or not. Why not go and read the full article on the Australian Teacher […]

Continue Reading

Shouldn’t every class be an Opportunity Class?

75 public schools and a large number of independent schools in NSW have an Opportunity Class. They specifically cater for “academically gifted and talented children in Years 5 and 6.” The NSWDEC states that: [Opportunity Classes] provide intellectual stimulation and an educationally rich environment. Am I missing something? Is that to suggest other – let’s call them – No Opportunity Classes are not stimulating or educationally rich? What does that say to those kids who aren’t in the OC – as it’s often […]

Continue Reading

Adaptability the Key to Success

Globalisation and the impact of technology means that, in many ways, the world of today is barely recognisable to that of twenty or thirty years ago. This is particularly true of the workplace. We’ve long been aware of the concept of offshoring the work force, although many of us still equate this to blue-collar work or call-centre services. The fact is more and more white-collar work is moving off shore, and the workplace is becoming increasingly “freelance.” We’re not sure […]

Continue Reading

“Just jump in the deep end!” – Worst Advice Ever!

There’s a reason I started to take my then three-year-old son to swimming lessons. It’s because, left unattended, he would have – most likely – jumped in the deep end without the pre-requisite skills to live to tell the story. Neither he or his mum were too keen on that scenario. Hence the weekly lessons. Just jumping in the deep end is a curious idiom. I can only assume it originated from swimming, but that would seem to suggest that someone […]

Continue Reading