Tag : teaching

Engaging the Student Voice

The basis for student voice is to be found in Article 12 of the United Nation Convention of the Rights of the Child, which sets out the right of children and young people to express an opinion and to have that opinion taken into account when decisions are being made on any matter that affects them. How many decisions at your school take into account the opinions of students? I mean really take students’ opinions into account. If we’re honest many of our […]

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Maybe class size does matter after all?

The key to a better education system is – by all accounts – to ensure we have better teachers.  Hard to argue with that isn’t it? And just for the record I’m all for enhancing teacher quality – who would argue against it? It’s just I’m not keen on the way that the phrase – teacher quality – is being used to underplay all the other factors that feed into education. Would we be so quick to accept this statement in say Medicine? The key […]

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We pay teachers waaaay too much!

This week I saw this tweet – an oldie but a goodie. Are you sick of overpaid teachers? http://t.co/OVw9HjDqBS — Jason Borton (@Borto74) May 30, 2014 It linked to this article.  I thought I’d put it into an Australian context. Teachers’ hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work nine or ten months a year! And with the focus on getting the budget back into surplus, I thought it’s time we put things in perspective and pay them […]

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How do you celebrate your students’ strengths?

You may, or may not know that I have been developing a strengths-based intervention program called Little Superheroes aimed at reaching kids at risk of disengaging. It’s part of my YouthEngage initiative, and working with Ph.D candidate, Dean Grimshaw we have just submitted our first set of research findings to the Department of Education. I shall share these with you very soon, but suffice to say I’m super excited by the results and the potential that exists to build further on […]

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3 Common Myths About Innovation in Education

1. We’re innovative. The kids all have iPads.  To do what? To do what you already did quicker, more efficiently or on a larger scale? In many schools the power of the iFad or whatever technology has been wheeled into the school is compromised by the way in which they’re allowed or – more importantly – not allowed to be used. Even if we adopt the higher order thinking of the SAMR Model, how innovative are we really being? Innovating in […]

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How do you know if your school is successful?

My latest #OffCampus segment for the TERPodcast focused on how schools measure their success, and whether or not we need a rethink. You can listen to it here. I touched on some broad themes, that each on their own could speak to your schools strategic plan for the next 5 years… you have one right? How and when do you measure your schools success? Do ‘value added’ data add anything of value? Do our ‘best’ students from our ‘best’ schools […]

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#MakeItMatter2Me

I regularly annoy math teachers by questioning why I would need to learn Pythagoras’ Theorem as a kid. Or Calculus? Seriously… does that even exist? And just to prove I’m not being mathsist, why should we care about Shakespeare? Whilst you might this I’m being facetious when I’m doing this, I’m trying to highlight that whilst I – as a somewhat educated 37 year-old – can see the value in each of the above, I wonder if it’s as apparent […]

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3 Common Myths About Positive Psychology

I originally wrote this for my regular Generation Next Column  In my work with schools, I’m finding more and more interest arising in the area of Positive Psychology and its offshoot Positive Education. And as the interest around these grow, so do some of the more common misconceptions. I’ve found some teachers to be a little cynical, and why wouldn’t we be? After all it seems we get told a new way, a better way of teaching on an almost weekly […]

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Does PSHE or Citizenship have a place your school day?

On Thursday 20th February at 8pm GMT, (7am on the Friday Morning AEDT in Sydney) I shall be hosting the #UKEdChat on Twitter. We’ll be talking about teaching citizenship, and Personal, Social & Health Education (PSHE) in schools. In the UK, PSHE education remains a non-statutory subject, but the National Curriculum framework document states that:  All schools should make provision for personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE), drawing on good practice. PSHE covers a wide range of concepts: Identity (their […]

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