Tag : change

Is “by teachers for teachers” always a good thing?

This is an excerpt from my latest Australian Teacher Magazine column. In schools it is not uncommon for outside agencies to be brought in to consult on initiatives, but should the consultant lack a background in education they can be quickly dismissed by a less than enthusiastic staffroom. After all, what would they know? Yet in other sectors and industries it is often seen as advantageous to bring people in from other domains as they are free of the common […]

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Snake, Walkmans, Moments & School…

What do these three things have in common,  and why on earth would I waste your time asking you that question? If you’re of a certain vintage you’ll be aware of just how amazing Nokia phones were. What’s that? You can’t remember? Check this out. Of course, Sony Walkmans were so popular even competitor’s offerings were referred to as Walkmans, and how many times have you thanked your lucky stars that your Kodak Moments weren’t captured in the era of Facebook or Instagram? Nowadays, a straw poll of any […]

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Stop Blaming ‘The System’

I often get asked to speak about engagement. I outline that four key considerations are essential if we are to genuinely engage kids (and staff) in our schools. They are: establishing good relationships, developing a sense of autonomy, encouraging mastery and having a bigger purpose than just chasing grades. Sometimes I hear that whilst these ideals are admirable – ‘The System’ means we can’t achieve them. To be honest, I’m tired of hearing this argument. I’m not even sure what people mean when they say ‘The […]

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Adaptability the Key to Success

Globalisation and the impact of technology means that, in many ways, the world of today is barely recognisable to that of twenty or thirty years ago. This is particularly true of the workplace. We’ve long been aware of the concept of offshoring the work force, although many of us still equate this to blue-collar work or call-centre services. The fact is more and more white-collar work is moving off shore, and the workplace is becoming increasingly “freelance.” We’re not sure […]

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“Just jump in the deep end!” – Worst Advice Ever!

There’s a reason I started to take my then three-year-old son to swimming lessons. It’s because, left unattended, he would have – most likely – jumped in the deep end without the pre-requisite skills to live to tell the story. Neither he or his mum were too keen on that scenario. Hence the weekly lessons. Just jumping in the deep end is a curious idiom. I can only assume it originated from swimming, but that would seem to suggest that someone […]

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Shut Up & Think!

I joined Twitter over three years ago. One of the first educators I followed was @cpaterso – or Cameron Paterson, as I’m assuming it says on his passport. His then-bio appealed to me. It was something along the lines of hating grades and – I think in the metaphorical rather than literal sense – wanting to “blow up school.” Since then I’ve enjoyed his thoughts on education, and had the pleasure of working with him and some of the staff at […]

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When’s the right time for change?

I was asked a great question on Twitter this week in response to a tweet I put out as part of research for a piece I’m writing. @danhaesler should teachers/ principals be circulated – fresh ideas or is 'if it's not broke don't fix it' a Better mentality?#acuedu_p — Kimberley (@kcolquhoun1987) May 25, 2012 I’m not sure there is a simple answer to Kimberley’s question. But for what it’s worth here’s my two cents… I don’t believe there is any […]

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